Research Medical Imaging

The Radiological Physics div­ision’s research is focused on the methodological develop­ment and basic research of the fundamentals of magnetic resonance (MR), and on their potential applications in the field of biophysical, biochemical, and clin­ical sciences.

Magnetic Resonance Electromyography<br/>MR motion encoding during electrical stimulation provides information about thigh muscle function. Potential applications include degenerative muscle diseases, rehabilitation monitoring after injuries, and muscle training in sports medicine.
Magnetic Resonance Electromyography
MR motion encoding during electrical stimulation provides information about thigh muscle function. Potential applications include degenerative muscle diseases, rehabilitation monitoring after injuries, and muscle training in sports medicine.

How does tissue microstructure affect the MR signal? Can cells be visualized with MR? What about imaging lung function with MR? These are typical questions asked and tackled by our group – a team currently consisting of fifteen members, mainly physicists and engineers, ranging from master and doctoral students to postdoc­toral associates and scientific staff members.

The analysis, description and development of rapid MR im­aging sequences has been a major research focus of our group for more than a decade. For instance, we design MR methods for pre­clinical and clinical research from low to ultra-high fields and de­velop techniques for motion or cell tracking and molecular im­aging. We have been active in the field of quantitative and interven­tional MR for years and have de­signed methods for tissue relax­ometry, catheter tracking and real-time feedback procedures for MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound. We also believe that functional imaging is not limited solely to the detection of brain activity, but can be applied to a variety of other organs, such as the lung, the heart and muscle tissue using dedicated and carefully designed MR tech­niques.

We have a close collaboration with the Image-Guided Therapy group and the Biomaterials Science group, and links to other groups at DBE are being established.