MIRACLE II (2022-2027)


Building on the achievements of the MIRACLE Project (MIRACLE I) led by Prof. Hans-Florian Zeilhofer and Prof. Philippe Cattin, researchers at the Department of Biomedical Engineering plan a second project phase. Supported by the Werner Siemens Foundation, the team around the engineer Philippe Cattin (Department of Biomedical Engineering) and facial surgeon PD Dr Dr Florian Thieringer (University Hospital Basel) aims at teaching a modular robot to print personalized bio-implants. This completely novel intervention will be planned using virtual reality. The resulting designs will be produced in 3D printing, perhaps one day even directly in the body of the patient.

For this second phase, the Werner Siemens Foundation has generously provided 12 Mio. CHF. Both projects run under the title "MIRACLE" (Minimally Invasive Robot-Assisted Computer-guided LaserosteotomE). The name is a promise by the researchers to enable groundbreaking  technology for surgery which from today's perspective  - and not only for laypersons - are synonymous with a MIRACLE. Please see the press release and follow us on LinkedIn. Check the short and long version of a film about MIRACLE I and a series of pictures below.

Contact: Dr Constanze Pfeiffer (constanze.pfeiffer@clutterunibas.ch)

A short portrait of the DBE MIRACLE-project.

A short portrait of the DBE MIRACLE-project.

h

Prof Dr Philippe Cattin
Principal Investigator MIRACLE II, head of CIAN and DBE
Gewerbestrasse 14
4123 Allschwil
Switzerland

d

PD Dr Dr Florian Thieringer MHBA
Principal Investigator MIRACLE II, head of 3D Print Lab
Spitalstrasse 21
4056 Basel
Switzerland
 

An extended portrait of the MIRACLE I-project.

An extended portrait of the MIRACLE I-project.

h

One of the results of the first funding phase: a high-precision robotic endoscope tip with integrated laser bone saw. PhD project of Manuela Eugster at the BIROMED-Lab. Foto: F. Brüderli (WSS)

h

Implants made of biomaterials like this bone regeneration enhancing scaffold are already being printed by facial surgeon Florian Thieringer at the 3D Print Lab at the University Hospital in Basel. Picture: R. Wendler

h

A masterpiece of 3D anatomical printing. This technology has developed rapidly in recent years. Now it is challenge to make it fit for intraoperative applications. Picture: R. Wendler

h

3D printing of a knee joint. Researchers of the first project phase are using it to calibrate their minimally invasive robot. PhD Project by Lorin Fasel of the BIROMED Lab. Picture: R. Wendler

h

3D printer in the 3D Print Lab of the Basel University Hospital. How can this technology be made so small that it can be used minimally invasive inside the body? Picture: R. Wendler

h

Hightech implant placed by Florian Thieringer at the University Hospital Basel. MIRACLE II aims to fundamentally change this procedure. Picture: Florian Thieringer/University Hospital Basel

h

Another result of the first funding phase: enhanced precision of planning surgical interventions in virtual reality - with participants potentially from all over the world. PhD project of Balàzs Faludi. Picture: F. Brüderli (WSS)

h

Implants made of biomaterials like this scaffold that enhances bone regeneration are already being printed by facial surgeon Florian Thieringer at the 3D Print Lab at the University Hospital in Basel. Picture: R. Wendler

h

A masterpiece of 3D anatomical printing. This technology has developed rapidly in recent years. Now the challenge is to make it fit for the operation room. Picture: R. Wendler

h

3D printing of a knee joint. Researchers of the first project phase are using it to calibrate their minimally invasive robot. PhD Project by Lorin Fasel of the BIROMED Lab. Picture: R. Wendler

h

3D printer in the 3D Print Lab of the Basel University Hospital. How can this technology be made so small that it can be used minimally invasive inside the body? Picture: R. Wendler

h

At the University Hospital Basel, 3D prints are being used for planning and simulating surgical interventions. An implant similar to this one is about to be placed inside a patient. Picture: Florian Thieringer/University Hospital Basel